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September 27th, 2004

NYU Hiring

In a move that might shock some in the philosophical community, NYU is about to commence a hiring campaign.

New York University is on a hiring campaign that it hopes will put its graduate and undergraduate liberal arts programs on sounder footing and give them the stature of some of its most prominent professional schools. Over the next five years, it plans to expand its 625-member arts and science faculty by 125 members, and replace another 125 who are expected to leave. (New York Times)

If hiring Ned Block, Hartry Field, Kit Fine, David Velleman etc etc was what they do in normal times, it could get a little scary to see what they do in an expansionary era.

Posted by Brian Weatherson in Uncategorized

2 Comments »

This entry was posted on Monday, September 27th, 2004 at 1:57 am and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the comments RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

2 Responses to “NYU Hiring”

  1. Brian Leiter says:

    One would imagine that one aim of this new initiative is to strengthen other faculties besides the two that have been built up successfully in the last decade (namely, Philosophy and Economics). Other than the longstanding strengths in Mathematics and Art History, most arts & sciences faculties at NYU are still rather weak (most aren’t even in the top 25 nationally, etc.).

  2. Ryan says:

    To echo Prof. Leiter, when NYU shifted presidency a while back, the goal was set of transforming the university into a research institution on par with Harvard, Princeton, Berkeley, etc. Rather than attempting to make simulataneous improvements across the board, the strategy was adopted of building things up one department at a time. It just so happens that the philosophy department was at the head of the line and saw a massive increase in funding. So, as Prof. Leiter suggested, its come time for some of the other departments to get their turn (though the recent Velleman hiring is evidence that the philosophy department isn’t entirely out of the hiring market).