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April 24th, 2007

Women in Philosophy

This is just a link to Brit’s report. Here are a couple of highlights.

21% of employed philosophers are women (Kathryn Norlock)

2004 US Department of Education estimates 41% of those employed in the humanities are women.

Philosophy PhDs awarded: 27% (and stuck there for the last ten years or so, with a spike to 33.3% in 2004, 25.1% in 2005).

Survey of Degrees Awarded (SED) 2005 figures. History 41%, Astronomy and physics 26%, Economics: 30%, Political Science 39%.

I was worried we were as bad as engineering in terms of percentage of PhDs who are women. (I read enginnering was at 18%.) It seems we are between physics and economics. I suspect that restricting attention to analytic philosophy makes our position look much worse, maybe as bad as engineering…

Posted by Brian Weatherson in Uncategorized

3 Comments »

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3 Responses to “Women in Philosophy”

  1. John Protevi says:

    Your last sentence is interesting. You seem to be implying that women are over-represented in continental philosophy and under-represented in analytic philosophy, compared to the profession as a whole. Any thoughts on how to find data on that?

  2. John Protevi says:

    I just found one data point. Kieran Healy has just posted this analysis of data from the 2004-2006 PGR. It shows the program most associated with continental philosophy (at least the SPEP variety) is Penn State, and they have the highest percentage of females as full-time professors (43%). I wonder what you would find at other continental-leaning (DePaul) or continental-friendly (Memphis / Vanderbilt / Emory) departments? They aren’t in the PGR, so we’d have to look online. The other (SPEP) continental-identified program in the PGR, Stony Brook, is right at 18%.

  3. Grace Helton says:

    Just now saw this post. If anyone’s still reading this thread: Is there any data on differential attrition of women as compared to men in Ph.D. programs? i.e., are women more likely to leave their programs than their male peers? Also, are women differentially filtered out at the bachelors level? I.e., do fewer women philosophy majors as compared to men pursue doctorates in the first place?

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